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Science Fair Log Entries and Due Dates (redirected from Science Fair Log Entries)

Page history last edited by Scott Knoflicek 7 months, 3 weeks ago

Guidelines for Science Fair Journal LOG Entries:

 

Students are required to have a bound JOURNAL, logbook, or other records for their science projects.  If you are keeping digital copies of your entries make sure and create a "Science Fair 2020-2021" folder to store all your entries, data, notes etc.

 

  • Begin each LOG entry on a new page or new Google Doc.

 

  • Always start by writing the DATE (and REQUIRED LOG ENTRY #) at the top of the page. If you work on an entry more than one day, note the dates in the margin each time you add to the entry. Some of the entries will take up more than one page and may require several attempts, so complete each entry in the order presented below.

 

  • Do NOT rip or tear out any pages in your logbook!

 

  • Your logbook will not be perfect, and you will make mistakes! That’s okay! Just draw a single line through the mistake and make a correction next to it. (I want to see your mistakes and how you went about making corrections!)

 

  •  Entries and notes can be written or printed and taped into your science fair logbook (as long as it is done neatly). All sides of the paper need to be taped and no folded over or double sided copies should be added.

 

  • Write as many notes as you can! It is better to have too much information than not enough.

 

  • Carefully record accurate measurements and write the date and time whenever making observations. (Mass is measured in grams, volume in liters or milliliters, and linear measurements in centimeters or meters.)

 

  • Take photographs and video (if possible) during your project. These can be used as part of your display. Write down who took the pictures and when/where so you can cite the source on the pictures you use in your display.

 

  • Cite any resources you use.

 

*** Complete the following LOG entries before experiment is complete.

 

A bound composition book or organized digital log entries are required to be used as your science fair logbook.  A paper notebook should be dedicated only for your science fair project and not be used for your science classwork or any other subject.  Here are some tips on how to make your science fair logbook the best it can be:

 

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/blog/2010/01/lab-notebooks.php

 

Overview of Due Dates (See Below for Details)

DUE October 22nd, 2020 Log Entry #1 through 3

DUE October 27th, 2020 Science Fair Topic Selection and Approval

DUE November 6th, 2020 Log Entry #4 & #5

DUE November 12th, 2020 Log Entry #6 

DUE November 13th, 2020 Log Entry #7 

DUE November 16th, 2020 Log Entry #8

DUE November 25th, 2020 Science Fair Contract Signed

DUE December 1st, 2020 Materials Pictures -Always be Knolling! (ABK)

DUE December 15th, 2020 Research Plan 

DUE December 22nd, 2020 Physical book and/or printed electronic scientific journal or article 

DUE December 23rd, 2020 Library book Research Notes 

DUE December 17th, 2020 (TBD) Carver Fair Student Application, Photo Permission Form

DUE January 12th, 2021 Background Tab Research Notes

DUE January 15th, 2021 Science Fair Research Paper

DUE January 20th, 2021 Final Experiment FlipGrid Pictures and/or Video 

DUE January 21st, 2021 Log Entry #9

DUE January 29th, 2021 Log Entry #11 through 12

DUE February 1st, 2021 Log Entry #13 through 16

DUE February 15th, 2021 Final Science Fair Video

DUE February 17th, 2021 Google Slides Presentation of Science Fair Project

DUE February 17th, 2021 Log Entry #17

April (TBD), 2021 McCall Science Fair 

March 1st, 2021 Philadelphia County Carver Science Fair

 April (TBD), 2021 Delaware Valley Tri-State Science Fair 

   

Science Fair Topic Selection

 

A resource of Science Fair Project Ideas and websites can be found HERE.

 

To get a sense of the types of project titles that won from last year's Delaware Valley Science Fair click HERE.


Read through the following info on each of the Branches of Science from the Science Fair Contract- Select the one you are most interested in.

 

Branches of Science Listing

 

Complete the Science Buddies Topic Selection Wizard- log in using your Philasd.org Google Account and save your ideas.  

 

NOTES: 

 

Your project MUST be a unique project.

 

You cannot share your project with anyone in 7th or 8th grade. Check here: Science Fair Projects Selected for 2020-2021 in 7th and 8th Grade

 

You may not get your top choice project- have at least two backups!  

 

Do not select project ideas on Science Buddies that have an Asterisk (*) as those projects a abbreviated projects. 

Research:

 

If too many people select projects within a particular branch of science then that branch will be closed.

 

Preference will be given to students that have completed all of the log entries prior to consulting with me.

 

Students will be selecting projects in a randomized order.

 

Please refer to the Science Buddies documents Projects Involving Human Subjects and make sure that you follow the steps to determining if pre approval from the Carver Science Fair Review committee is required or not.  LOTS of additional paperwork is required by YOU if you select a project that requires and I pre approval.

 

Projects Not Requiring Pre-approval

ISEF rules give the following examples of projects that do not require pre-approval:

  • Product testing of engineering projects or inventions (NO health hazard, NO personal data collected, and all feedback is in direct reference to the product) do NOT require SRC review, but it is recommended that a Risk Assessment Form be completed
  • Data/record review studies (e.g., baseball statistics, crime statistics) in which the data are taken from pre-existing data sets that are publicly available or published and there is no extra data taken from new individuals
  • Behavioral observations of unrestricted, public settings (e.g., shopping mall, public park) in which all of the following apply:
    • The researcher has no interaction with the individuals being observed,
    • The researcher does not manipulate the environment in any way and
    • The researcher does not record any personally identifiable data.
  • Data that has been collected by a health professional and given to a student to use in which all of these restrictions apply:
    • The original data was collected and shared in a manner that complies with all a federal privacy and HIPPA laws
    • The data is devoid of any information that would identify the people the data is based on. All information has been de-identified and rendered anonymous.

 

Please refer to the Science Buddies documents Projects Involving Potentially Hazardous or Biological Agents and make sure that you follow the steps to determining if pre approval from the Carver Science Fair Review committee is required or not.  LOTS of additional paperwork is required by YOU if you select a project that required pre approval.

 

Projects Not Requiring Pre-approval

"The following types of tissue do not need to be treated as potentially hazardous biological agents" (Science Service, 2009):

  1. Studies involving baker's yeast and brewer's yeast, except when involved with rDNA studies
  2. Studies involving Lactobacillus, Bacillus thurgensis, nitrogen-fixing, oil-eating bacteria, slime mold, and algae-eating bacteria introduced into their natural environment. Not exempt if cultured in a Petri dish environment that could potentially be contaminated.
  3. Studies of mold growth on food items if the experiment is terminated at the first evidence of mold.
  4. Plant tissue
  5. Meat or meat by-products obtained from food stores, restaurants, or packing houses
  6. Hair
  7. Teeth that have been sterilized to kill any blood borne pathogen that may be present. Chemical disinfection or autoclaving at 121 degrees Celsius for 20 minutes is a recommended procedure.
  8. Fossilized tissue or archeological specimens
  9. Prepared fixed tissue slides.

The following types of studies do not need SRC review, but you will need to complete the Risk Assessment Form:

  1. Studies involving most protists, archae and similar microorganisms
  2. Research using manure for composting or other non-culturing experiments and fuel production
  3. Commercially-available color change coliform water test kits which will remain sealed and will be properly disposed.

 

Please check these sources to ensure your project is exempt from further review:

Projects Involving Non Human Vertebrate Animals

Projects Involving Hazardous Chemicals, Activities, or Devices 

 

Thanks for understanding.

 

 

DUE October 22nd, 2020
Log Entry #1
- Copy these important terms and definitions into your science fair logbook as the first entry: 

1. CONTROLLED EXPERIMENT: a series of steps that test a hypothesis in which a control is used

2. HYPOTHESIS: a prediction or educated guess about a problem that can be tested

 

3. CONTROL: a standard with which to compare the results

4. INDEPENDENT (manipulated) VARIABLE: the factor in a controlled experiment that is changed

5. DEPENDENT (responding) VARIABLE: the factor in an experiment being measured or observed

 

DUE October 22nd, 2020
Log Entry #2 Copy these questions and then respond to them in your science fair logbook:

 

BRAINSTORMING: CREATE a personal brainstorming list of things that you are interested in, science topics you like, branches of science you are interested, or possible questions you might be interested in investigating (see page 5 of science fair contract)

 

LIST 10 THINGS YOU ARE INTERESTED IN OR HOBBIES YOU HAVE: (examples: playing the piano, football, computers, people watching, plants, chemistry, skateboards, animals, photography, …)

OR :   THAT YOU HAVE WONDERED ABOUT: (examples: is black print easier to read than blue? Do brown eggs have more cholesterol than white? Would a helicopter fly better if it had more blades? What care do computer disks really need? Which fishing line is the strongest?)

1._______________________________________

2._______________________________________

3._______________________________________

4._______________________________________

5._______________________________________

6._______________________________________

7._______________________________________

8._______________________________________

9._______________________________________

10.______________________________________

 

DUE October 22nd, 2020
Log Entry #3

 

Copy these questions and prompts into your science fair logbook and then respond to them.

 

Of the 10 things you listed, pick 4 and ask yourself 5 questions about it... questions you’d really like to know the answers to. For example, let’s say you really like football. Your questions might include, “Can I write a computer program to predict the outcome of this year’s NFL games?” Would young players learn faster if the coach used a computer to diagram plays?” “Do Pac-Man whizzes make better passers?” Or, getting away from computers, “Do players with thicker necks suffer fewer injuries?” Does artificial turf produce more touchdowns?’ “What is the relationship between body fat and running speed?”

 

and

 

 

Thing/Topic You Are Interested in #1: ___________________
Question 1._________________________________________ ______________________
Question 2._________________________________________ ______________________
Question 3._________________________________________ ______________________

Question 4._______________________________________________________________

Question 5._______________________________________________________________

 

 

Thing/Topic You Are Interested in #2: ___________________

Question 1._________________________________________ ______________________
Question 2._________________________________________ ______________________
Question 3._________________________________________ ______________________

Question 4._______________________________________________________________

Question 5._______________________________________________________________

 

 

Thing/Topic You Are Interested in #3: ___________________

Question 1._________________________________________ ______________________
Question 2._________________________________________ ______________________
Question 3._________________________________________ ______________________

Question 4._______________________________________________________________

Question 5._______________________________________________________________

 

Thing/Topic You Are Interested in #4: ___________________

Question 1._________________________________________ ______________________
Question 2._________________________________________ ______________________
Question 3._________________________________________ ______________________

Question 4._______________________________________________________________

Question 5._______________________________________________________________

 

 

IF YOU COULD PICK YOUR FAVORITE THING/TOPIC, WHICH WOULD IT BE??

 _____________________________________________ 

AND IF YOU COULD PICK YOUR FAVORITE RESEARCH QUESTION ABOUT YOUR THING/TOPIC, WHICH WOULD IT BE??

 ________________________________________________________________________

 

  

What do you already know about this topic? Give as much detail as possible!

What about your topic will you need to know more about?

(These topics you will need to research! If you have trouble coming up with ideas, ask me for guidance!)

 

 

DUE October 27th, 2020

Science Fair Topic Selection Assignment:

 

Copy the Following into your science fair logbook and fill in the blanks based on the projects you have selected based on your selection using the topic selection wizard and other resources:

 

MY 3 favorite project ideas from Science Buddies or other website and/or developed on your own and the Research Questions (under Background tab for your project) that it asks are:

 

1) Science Buddies or Self Design Project Title #1 ____________________________

Paste the Link to Summary Tab of the Project Idea HERE:

Branch of Science it relates to based on the link name or information in the Background Tab ______________________

 

Research Questions (from the background tab below Terms and Concepts): 

 

2) Science Buddies or Self Design Project Title #2 ____________________________

Paste the Link to Summary Tab of the Project Idea HERE:

Branch of Science it relates to based on the link name or information in the Background Tab ______________________

 

Research Questions (from the background tab below Terms and Concepts): 

 

 

3) Science Buddies or Self Design Project Title #3 ____________________________

Paste the Link to Summary Tab of the Project Idea HERE:

Branch of Science it relates to based on the link name or information in the Background Tab _____________________

 

Research Questions (from the background tab below Terms and Concepts): 

 

IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO: ADD ADDITIONAL PROJECT IDEAS IN THE ORDER YOU WOULD LIKE THEM BELOW


DUE November 6th, 2020

 Log Entry #4
COMPLETE ONLY AFTER GETTING MY APPROVAL TO DO YOUR FAV. PROJECT IDEA...

Copy these questions and prompts into your science fair logbook and then respond to them.


1. My question is (Use the Objective on the Summary Tab to create your question):

2. The purpose of my experiment is to determine the effect(s) of ___________ on _________.

3. I became interested in this idea when I noticed/saw...

4. The knowledge I gain from my experiment will help... (who will it help and how?) - Use the Learn More tab.

 

5. My hypothesis:  Example: "If _____[I do this] _____, then _____[this]_____ will happen."

 

Hypotheses Tips

 

  • The question comes first. Before you make a hypothesis, you have to clearly identify the question you are interested in studying.
  • A hypothesis is a statement, not a question. Your hypothesis is not the scientific question in your project. The hypothesis is an educated, testable prediction about what will happen.
  • Make it clear. A good hypothesis is written in clear and simple language. Reading your hypothesis should tell a teacher or judge exactly what you thought was going to happen when you started your project.
  • Keep the variables in mind. A good hypothesis defines the variables in easy-to-measure terms, like who the participants are, what changes during the testing, and what the effect of the changes will be. (For more information about identifying variables, see: Variables in Your Science Fair Project.)
  • Make sure your hypothesis is "testable." To prove or disprove your hypothesis, you need to be able to do an experiment and take measurements or make observations to see how two things (your variables) are related. You should also be able to repeat your experiment over and over again, if necessary.

    To create a "testable" hypothesis make sure you have done all of these things:

    • Thought about what experiments you will need to carry out to do the test.
    • Identified the variables in the project.
    • Included the independent and dependent variables in the hypothesis statement. (This helps ensure that your statement is specific enough.
  • Do your research. You may find many studies similar to yours have already been conducted. What you learn from available research and data can help you shape your project and hypothesis.
  • Don't bite off more than you can chew! Answering some scientific questions can involve more than one experiment, each with its own hypothesis. Make sure your hypothesis is a specific statement relating to a single experiment.

 

6. I base my hypothesis on ... (cite prior knowledge and research gathered)

 

NOTE: If your project is an engineering project, you will not follow the traditional scientific method steps.  You will need to refer to the engineering design process and follow the applicable steps going forward in the list of log entries:  

 

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/engineering-design-process/engineering-design-compare-scientific-method.shtml

 

DUE November 6th, 2020

Log Entry #5
Copy these questions and prompts into your science fair logbook and then respond to them.


1. My Independent variable is:

2. My Dependent variable is:

3. Factors that must remain constant include: (List as many as you can.)

4. What is my control group (if it applies to your project)?

5. I will conduct _____ trials (times you vary your independent variable).  

 

In order to have confidence that your survey results are representative, it is critically important that you have a large number of randomly-selected participants in each group you survey. See this link for Survey Sample Size Selection. 

 

DUE November 12th, 2020

Log Entry #6

 List the step-by-step procedures you will follow to conduct your experiment in your science fair logbook.

 

(1, 2, 3, 4, ...) Be sure to include exact measurements (metric) and quantities.  These procedures should be the EXACT way in which you plan to conduct your experiment.  They should include ALL of the steps as outlined in the science buddies "Procedure" tab and any of the changes or additional steps you will be using as part of the "Make it Your Own" tab.  (The steps should be written so that they could be followed by someone else and result in the same outcome as you).

 

Procedures can be written by hand or printed and taped into your science fair logbook (as long as it is done neatly). All sides of the paper need to be taped and no folded over or double sided copies should be added.

 

If your project involves a survey of participants use this link to help design it and include within your procedures for this log entry.

 

DUE November 13th, 2020
Log Entry #7 (Risk Assessment)

 

Complete the Online Risk Assessment Survey Wizard - Pay special attention to the pop up warnings as you click on items that your project may have. 

 

Use the information from this link to determine if there are risks with your project and if the risks are no more than minimal risk or if the risks are more than minimal:

Risk Assessment Info From the Carver Fair  

 

Copy these questions and prompts into your science fair logbook and then respond to them.
1. Is there anything listed under "Safety" in the Summary Tab on your science buddies project page. 

 

2. Identify and describe any risks involved in your experiment. List the hazardous activity, device, chemical, or microorganism and explain the risks involved.

3. Did the Rules Wizard indicate that your experiment will be conducted at home or school and would include potentially hazardous biological agents such as microorganisms, rDNA, or human and animals tissues?

 

4. Did the Summary results from the Rules Wizard list any other forms in order to adhere to the International Rules OTHER THAN these four forms:

Checklist for Adult Sponsor (1),  Student Checklist (1A) and Research Plan,  Approval Form (1B), and Official Abstract Form (87 kb).  If Yes, list the forms necessary and their descriptions here: 

 

5. Describe safety precautions and procedures that will be used to reduce potential risks - be specific and overly cautious.

 

6.  If your project involves human subjects, potentially hazardous or biological agents, hazardous chemicals, activities or devices, or non human vertebrates:  Does your project require pre-approval as per the info below? Why is it exempt from pre-approval?  Why is it not exempt from pre-approval?  If your project Requires an Informed Consent Sample make sure to include a copy of it that you will give to get parental permission.

 

Also look to see below for projects involving human subject volunteers:

 

Working with Human Test Subjects (If you are testing with human subjects this additional information needs to be included-ALL of it!)

There are special considerations when designing an experiment involving human subjects. Fairs affiliated with Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) often require an Informed Consent Form (permission sheet) for every participant who is questioned. Consult the rules and regulations of the science fair that you are entering, prior to performing experiments or surveys. Please refer to the Science Buddies documents Projects Involving Human Subjects and make sure that you follow the steps to determining if pre approval from the Carver Science Fair Review committee is required or not. 

 

Write down the safety precautions from that link and combine with the safety requirement from this resource Scientific Review Committee to craft your specialized Risk and Safety Concerns safety that you will include in your Research Plan. If you are working with minors, you must get advance permission from the children's parents or guardians (and teachers if you are performing the test while they are in school) to make sure that it is all right for the children to participate in the science fair project.

 

Informed Consent Form for Carver Fair and Informed Consent Template to give to parents. 

 

Here are suggested guidelines for obtaining permission for working with minors:

  1. Write a clear description of your science fair project, what you are studying, and what you hope to learn. Include how the child will be tested. Include a paragraph where you get a parent's or guardian's and/or teacher's signature.
  2. Print out as many copies as you need for each child you will be surveying.
  3. Pass out the permission sheet to the children or to the teachers of the children to give to the parents. You must have permission for all the children in order to be able to use them as test subjects!

 

Please refer to the Science Buddies documents Projects Involving Human Subjects and make sure that you follow the steps to determining if pre approval from the Carver Science Fair Review committee is required or not.  LOTS of additional paperwork is required by YOU if you select a project that requires and I pre approval.

 

Projects Not Requiring Pre-approval

ISEF rules give the following examples of projects that do not require pre-approval:

  • Product testing of engineering projects or inventions (NO health hazard, NO personal data collected, and all feedback is in direct reference to the product) do NOT require SRC review, but it is recommended that a Risk Assessment Form be completed
  • Data/record review studies (e.g., baseball statistics, crime statistics) in which the data are taken from pre-existing data sets that are publicly available or published and there is no extra data taken from new individuals
  • Behavioral observations of unrestricted, public settings (e.g., shopping mall, public park) in which all of the following apply:
    • The researcher has no interaction with the individuals being observed,
    • The researcher does not manipulate the environment in any way and
    • The researcher does not record any personally identifiable data.
  • Data that has been collected by a health professional and given to a student to use in which all of these restrictions apply:
    • The original data was collected and shared in a manner that complies with all a federal privacy and HIPPA laws
    • The data is devoid of any information that would identify the people the data is based on. All information has been de-identified and rendered anonymous.

 

Please refer to the Science Buddies documents Projects Involving Potentially Hazardous or Biological Agents and make sure that you follow the steps to determining if pre approval from the Carver Science Fair Review committee is required or not.  LOTS of additional paperwork is required by YOU if you select a project that required pre approval.

 

Projects Not Requiring Pre-approval

"The following types of tissue do not need to be treated as potentially hazardous biological agents" (Science Service, 2009):

  1. Studies involving baker's yeast and brewer's yeast, except when involved with rDNA studies
  2. Studies involving Lactobacillus, Bacillus thurgensis, nitrogen-fixing, oil-eating bacteria, slime mold, and algae-eating bacteria introduced into their natural environment. Not exempt if cultured in a Petri dish environment that could potentially be contaminated.
  3. Studies of mold growth on food items if the experiment is terminated at the first evidence of mold.
  4. Plant tissue
  5. Meat or meat by-products obtained from food stores, restaurants, or packing houses
  6. Hair
  7. Teeth that have been sterilized to kill any blood borne pathogen that may be present. Chemical disinfection or autoclaving at 121 degrees Celsius for 20 minutes is a recommended procedure.
  8. Fossilized tissue or archeological specimens
  9. Prepared fixed tissue slides.

The following types of studies do not need SRC review, but you will need to complete the Risk Assessment Form:

  1. Studies involving most protists, archae and similar microorganisms
  2. Research using manure for composting or other non-culturing experiments and fuel production
  3. Commercially-available color change coliform water test kits which will remain sealed and will be properly disposed.

 

Use the following links related to Microbiology if that applies to your project:

 

Microbiology Techniques and Troubleshooting

All About Agar 

Inoculation: How to Put the Bacteria You Desire on a Petri Dish

Interpreting Plates

Storing Bacterial Strains

 

Please also check these sources to ensure your project is exempt from further review:

Projects Involving Non Human Vertebrate Animals  If you are working with a cat, dog, or other non human vertebrate.

Projects Involving Hazardous Chemicals, Activities, or Devices  - Double check that the chemical you are working with isn't listed as a hazardous chemical and needs special safety precautions.

 

 

DUE November 16th, 2020
Log Entry #8  Make a LIST of the materials you will require for your experiment.  

 

What type of supplies and equipment will you need to complete your science fair project? By making a complete list ahead of time, you can make sure that you have everything on hand when you need it. Some items may take time to obtain as you may need to order them, so making a materials list in advance represents good planning!

 

Make the materials list as specific as possible, and be sure you can get everything you need before you start your science fair project. While you are making your shopping list, do not forget the supplies for your Science Fair Project Display Board (Do not calculate the cost of presentation boards and supplies to create your physical presentation- this year you will be designing a Google Slides presentation as your tri-fold board)

 

Copy this table into your science fair logbook and fill in with all of the materials you will need for your project.

 

Quantity Required  Detailed Item Description   Where will you get this item? I have at home/Will get at ______ store/Borrow from _____/Order online from ______  Price in $ 
 
     
       

 

You should order any kits or materials online by November 12th, 2020 so that you can have them for when your Materials Pictures are due.

          

DUE November 25th, 2020

Once you have submitted Log Entries #1-8 -Go through the Science Fair Project Contract with your parents/guardians

 

 Both you and a parent will Print and Date at the bottom to indicate you agree.

 

Once I have reviewed your log entries 1 through 8 and I have received/returned your completed science fair contract, you should start to collect your materials needed for your experimentation.  

 

 

 Signed Project Contract

 

DUE December 1st, 2020

Materials Pictures Video

 

Record a FlipGrid video providing proof that you have gathered all of the materials needed for experimentation.  You should copy and paste the materials list from your Science Buddies project idea into the assignment and have pictures of all of your materials laid out where each item from your materials list can be seen.  Make sure that it is obvious that the video shows YOUR materials.  If you are waiting for the materials that you purchased to be delivered, you may include a description of when you anticipate delivery of the item(s).

 

Here are some well-knolled photos from previous years.

 

Remember to Always Be Knolling (ABK)
Scan your environment for materials, tools, books, music, etc. which are not in use.
Put away everything not in use. 
If you aren't sure, leave it out.
Group all 'like' objects.
Align or square all objects to either the surface they rest on, or the studio itself.
Doesn't that look nice? 
Now take an overhead video of them.  

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s-CTkbHnpNQ

 

DUE December 15th, 2020

Research Plan  - at least 1 source in your bibliography needs to be a physical book, research paper or magazine article.  

 

DUE December 22nd, 2020

Have in hand your physical library book and/or printed electronic scientific journal or article (if in the Biology Class) from your Bibliography within your Research Plan

 

For All:

(8 sources for the science behind your project with at least one being a book).   

To find the category of book that your project is in go to the Summary Tab on Science Buddies and find the "Areas of Science" look at the McCall Science Fair Projects 2020-2021 and find the Dewey Decimal Call Number by referencing this table. Most of your project's subjects will have Dewey Decimal numbers in the 500s on page 16 of 20 in the table. 

 

In order to assist you in the process of searching for a book from the Free Library of Philadelphia system, Ms. Betsy from the Independence Branch of the library has created this stepper.  Carefully review the search method for the example project on apple browning and use the same methods to find key words and phrases under the background tab of YOUR science fair project on Science Buddies.

 

Check out McCall’s Library Resources HERE (inactive for 2020-2021 SY) or the Free Library of Philadelphia Independence Branch HERE.  If the Library opens for browsing the stacks then you can follow the pictures from 1-6 to find the 500 Dewey Decimal stacks of science based non fiction shelves are is located HERE.  To access the Free Library of Philadelphia Parkway Central Branch click HERE.   Follow the pictures from 1-10 on how to find the stacks of science based non fiction shelves clickHERE

 

If you plan to study vertebrate animals , then one of these references MUST be an animal care and husbandry resource.

 

To find the other sources of information other that your book to reach the 8 source minimum for our Bibliography, you can look under the Background Tab in the "News Feed on this Topic" for related articles.  You can find articles there from the following sources that related directly to the science behind your project:

Science News for Students - Readability from 6th grade to 9th grade reading levels

EurekAlert! from AAAS - EurekAlert! is a nonprofit news-release distribution platform operated by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) as a resource for journalists and the public.

 

For students in Biology:

In addition to above, a more advanced search of the scientific papers that have been published within scientific journals will need to be done in addition to the physical book and online sources.  I would start by using Google Scholar. These sources are specifically written to share the results of scientific studies with other scientists studying similar topics.  They are written on a very advanced level and may be difficult to decipher.  I also have many paper copies of Science Magazine from AAAS in Room 319.  This scientific paper search is more for you to see the format of an actual research paper than for you to read and understand all of it.  If you find a paper using search terms from the "Background" tab "Terms and Concepts" or research "Questions" you might be able to understand the abstract, but will seem like a foreign language after that.

 

If you have found an article that matches the science of your project and you can’t seem to access or download a PDF without paying to view, come see me. 

 

DUE December 23rd, 2020

Library book research notes:  Taking Notes for Research - Example - Use this document to record your notes for your project for your library book first (so that you can return it to the library when it is due).  You will use this template for the research for all of you 8 sources in your Research Plan eventually, but start with your library book notes - so you can return it on time.  You can also renew a library book online with your library card for an additional two week time period.  

 

 

 

DUE December 17th, 2020

Complete the Student Application.  Use the below instructions and follow very carefully.  If you have a question read through these instructions completely then ask me for help.  Complete the Special Forms Quiz to see if you need to complete additional forms.  If you do, print out and include the necessary formsInformed Consent Form for Carver Fair and Informed Consent Template to give to parents.   Also make sure to read through and complete the Carver Fair Risk Assessment.

 

Grades 7-12 G.W. Carver Science Fair Application additional instructions:

 

8. School Name: McCall School   Pony #: 2340

9. School Address: 325 South 7th Street

10. City: Philadelphia  Zip: 19106

11. School Phone: 215-400-7840 School Fax: 215-400-7841

12. Sponsor Last Name: Knoflicek  First Name: Scott 

13. Sponsor E-Mail Address: sknoflicek@philasd.org 

14. Title of Project: (Use the title of your project that you come up with NOT the science buddies title)

15. Category Number: If you are unsure look HERE.

16. Does your project require electricity?  Select NO 

17. Are you bringing a computer?  Select YES.

 

Have both STUDENT and PARENT signatures completed (Mr. Knoflicek will sign as the SPONSOR.  Leave the "Checklist for Adult Sponsor" page blank.

 

Student Checklist (1A) Additional Instructions:

 

1. a. Student/Team Leader: this is you (there will not be a team project from McCall)

3. School: McCall School   School Phone: 215-400-7840

School Address: 325 South 7th Street

                          Philadelphia, PA 19106

4. Adult Sponsor: Scott Knoflicek  Phone/Email: 215-400-7840 sknoflicek@philasd.org 

5. Does this project need pre-approval? Select NO Tentative Start Date: January 12th , 2020.

6.  Is this a continuation/progression from a previous year? Select NO

7.  This year's laboratory experiment/data collection:

  Actual Start Date: 01/20/21    End Date 03/02/21

8. Where will you conduct your experimentation?  Check Home or School

9. List Name and address of all non-school work site(s):

  Name: (your name)

Address: (your address)

Phone: (your home phone number) 

 

Approval Form (1B)  Additional Instructions:

 

Read, print, sign, and date the Student Acknowledgement and have your parent/guardian read, print name, sign name, and date the Parent/Guardian Approval. DO NOT COMPLETE PART 2 or 3.

 

DO NOT REGISTER ONLINE - MR. KNOFLICEK will do this for you.

 

Print a copy of the WHOLE application including your Research Plan and secure with a paper clip or staple in the top left corner.

 

DUE January 12th, 2021

 Taking Notes for Research - Example - 

Add to the Library book research notes:  Taking Notes for Research - Example - Use this document to record your notes for your project for your Background Tab information.  You will use this template for the research for all of you 8 sources in your Research Plan eventually.

Extract all of the information from the paragraphs of text -especially as it relates to your research questions and helping define your terms and concepts words.

 

DUE January 15th, 2021

Science Fair Research Paper Due - Template and Rubric For Science Fair Research Paper

 

7th Grade Core Curriculum Exemplary Writing- Example Science Research Paper 

*** Complete the following LOG entries after experiment is complete.
 

 

DUE January 20th, 2021

Final Experiment Pictures and/or Video 

 

Show me Pictures of your experiment at different stages of your experimentation - these will be used in your final paper, powerpoint and show board.

 

Either create a FlipGrid Video or upload pictures to this Google Classroom assignment providing proof that YOU are conducting your experimentation.  This should be pictures of your materials and how you are setting up your experiment.  Make sure that is is obvious that it is YOUR picture not pulled from Google Images.

 

DUE January 21st, 2021

Log Entry #9  (Background knowledge and research)

 1. From your research, what new things have you learned about to your topic or related to your

question? 

2. What did your research indicate about the possible outcomes?

3. Does your research support or contradict your hypothesis?

 

 

DUE January 29th, 2021

Log Entry #11 (Results) 

Create Your Table of Results Here (this might be done for you in an orange table from your science buddies procedures):

 

 

 

1. State the results of your experiment based on the data and observations you collected.

 

 

2. Calculate an average for each test group as well as the control group (if applicable). 

 

 

3. Do you think your results are reliable? Why or why not?

 

 

Bonus: Check out THIS infographic about the reliability of certain types of data. Which types of scientific evidence did your project use?

 

Bonus: Check out THIS infographic on ways to spot when science is done poorly.  Address any limitations of your data based on this.

 

Log Entry #12

1. If your data is numeric (numbers instead of words) then you should design an appropriate graph to visually summarize the data you collected during your experiment. (This may take several attempts. Do NOT tear out pages in your LOG!)

 

 2. My graph shows the effects of _____________________ (the independent variable) on

 

_____________________ (the dependent variable).  

 

 3. My x-axis variable is: 

 

4. My y-axis variable is: 

 

5. The unit of measurement for each is: 

 

6. The title of my graph will be:

 

Use Template for Graph/Chart to be used in Google Drive Spreadsheet to enter your data into Google Sheets and then create an electronic version of your graph. 

 

 

 

 

DUE February 1st, 2021

Log Entry #13 (Future Considerations)

1. Were there any factors or conditions that you think may have affected the outcome of your experiment, other than the independent variable? Explain.

 2. Review your results and search for patterns or trends in your data. Describe your findings.

 3. If you were to conduct this experiment again, what would you do differently?

(“I would not change anything” is not an acceptable answer!)
 
Log Entry #14 (Conclusion) 1. The results of my experiment (support/contradict) my hypothesis because ... (Provide

specific examples of what you observed during your experiment.)

2. Because of the results of this experiment, I wonder ... (Describe additional experiments that

could be conducted to further investigate and understand your topic.)

3. The usefulness of my findings will benefit ...

 

Log Entry #15 

 

After finishing research and experimentation, you are required to write a (maximum) 250 word, one-page abstract. This should be written on the Official Abstract and Certification Form as provided by Science Service.  The abstract should include:

a)      purpose of the experiment

b)     b) procedures used,

c)      c) data, and

d)     d) conclusions.

It may also include any possible research applications.

Only minimal reference to previous work may be included.  An abstract should not include:

a)      acknowledgments (including naming the research institution and/ or mentor with which you were working), or

b)     work or procedures done by the mentor.

 

Example Abstract

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_sample_abstract.shtml

http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/project_abstract.shtml#whatsanabstract

 

Template for writing your own Abstract

 


Log Entry #16

1.     Now that you are finished with Science Fair, how do you feel?

 

2. Out of 100%, how much effort do you feel you put into your project?

 

DUE February 5th, 2021 
Final Science Fair Report

Final Science Fair Report Rubric

Final Science Fair Example/Template

 

DUE February 8th, 2021
Science Fair Tri-Fold Board

Ideas for Completing your Tri-Fold Board from Science Buddies


The Cybrary has several computers that are available to print black and white and colour printouts.  Access to the Cybrary can be done during your lunch/recess, during your science class, or by appointment with Ms. Phillips.  Glossy colour printouts (they look amazingly better than colour print outs) can be easily made at local FedEx/UPS Store/CVS/Rite Aid's.  There is a CVS at 314 South 5th Street, a FedEx at 1201 Market Street. and at 924 Chestnut Street and a UPS Store at 614 South 4th Street 

 

I would be happy to help you print color copies if you cannot do it yourself.  Send me individual .jpg or .png (screenshot) files via email.  Prices are 33 cents plus tax for each for 4X6 inch print.  Larger format sizes 5X7, 8x10, 5x5, 6x6, or 6x8 are $2.99 each.  Please specify if you would like one of the larger sizes.  Make sure that the image quality of your photos are taken with a high quality camera for larger sizes or they may not print well or at all.

 

Checklist for Tri-Fold Board:

 

What Makes for a Good Science Fair Project Display Board? For a Good Science Fair Project Display Board, You Should Answer "Yes" to Every Question
Does your display board include:
  • Title 
  • Question
  • Hypothesis
  • Background Research
  • Materials 
  • Experimental Procedures
  • Data Analysis -  and discussion including data chart(s) & graph(s)
  • Conclusions (including ideas for future research)
  • Bibliography
Yes / No
Are the sections on your display board organized like a newspaper so that they are easy to follow? Yes / No
Is the text font large enough to be read easily (at least 16 points)? Yes / No
Does the title catch people's attention, and is the title font large enough to be read from across the room? Yes / No
Did you use pictures and diagrams to effectively convey information about your science fair project?  Are they in Color? Yes / No
Have you constructed your display board as neatly as possible? Yes / No
Did you proofread your display board? Yes / No
Did you follow all of the rules pertaining to display boards for your particular science fair? Yes / No

 

Samples Tri-Folds from Science Buddies

Previous McCall Student Tri-Folds 2018-2019

Previous McCall Student Tri-Folds 2017-2018

Previous McCall Student Tri-Folds 2016-2017

Previous McCall Student Tri-Folds 2015-2016

Previous McCall Student Tr-Folds 2013-2014

Previous McCall Student Tri-Folds 2011-2012

 

DUE February 15th, 2021

Using FlipGrid or any other video recording software- share out ideas!!, create a video less than 4 minutes describing: How did you come up with the idea for this project? What was something interesting you learned from your research? How long did it take you to run the experiment/build the apparatus? How did the equipment work? Do you have any ideas about how the research might be applied? Where in the experiment was it most likely for errors to occur? What are some ways to mitigate the errors? A brief summary of any previous results for background. What new questions arose during the research? What might you study further? If you built an apparatus consider showing it in action.

 

DUE February 17th, 2021

Google Slides Presentation of Science Fair Project

 

2020 Virtual Judging

Format Requirements

​It is important to remember that this presentation is intended to be read and evaluated on a computer screen, likely a smaller format screen like a laptop or an iPad. A clean approach ensures that all of your science/engineering is showcased, not your graphic design ability. Please follow this format so that the judges don't miss your research.

​​

  1. The presentation MUST be a single PDF document limited to no more than 12 pages.

  2. The page size MUST be Standard 8.5" X 11" 

  3. The PDF document must open with default magnification.  Judges will probably be viewing the document on a laptop or iPad screen in "Landscape Mode" ( Wider than it is tall) so your pages should also be in Landscape. Don't make the Judges work to read your presentation! The presentation should read like a paper report.

  4. There should be no links or embedded video in the document. There should be no additional instructions for how to open and read the document.

  5. The page background color must be WHITE.  This ensures that any judges with color vision problems will be able to read the presentation.

  6. The text color should be predominantly black. 

  7. All text should be easily readable when viewing the entire page at once. Minimum font size is 14pt. 

Format Recommendations

These recommendations will help ensure that your work and progress are adequately displayed in a readable format.

  1. Don't use non-standard fonts or colors to "Stand out from the crowd" you run the risk of standing out as "the project that was very difficult to read". If you have doubts about a font, use Arial, it's the default for Google Slides and is included in Mac and Windows. 

  2. Your page titles should be an 18pt. font minimum.

  3. Avoid long expository paragraphs. State your points succinctly. 

  4. Use bullet points or numbering where appropriate to clearly make your points.

  5. Try to keep all of your text consistent across the presentation. Remember, this is a scientific paper,  impress the judges with your work.

 

Project Templates

These are some Google Slides presentation templates that conform to the ISEF guidelines. We recommend following the guidelines as closely as possible for consistency. Remember that you have 12 pages. Use them as you need them.

Science Projects 

Engineering Projects

 

Checklist for Presentation of Tri-Fold and Google Slides Document

Google Slides/Oral Presentation of Science Fair Project Rubric

 

Create your Powerpoint/Google Slides Presentation using the How Science Works Flow Chart using https://media.hhmi.org/biointeractive/click/understanding-science/#/main and make sure that you have included a discussion from each colored section Red is Exploration and Discovery Green is Testing Ideas Purple is Community Analysis and Feedback and Blue is Benefits and Outcomes.

Once you have added the pathways you would like to have on you slides, Export to Powerpoint and save in your Google Drive.  Further editing of the slides can be done after the export.

 

Here is a document with Practice questions to prepare for the Fair.

2020 McCall Science Fair Judging Google Form

Carver Science Fair Judging Rubric

 

DUE February 15th, 2021

Log Entry #17

 

Prepare written responses Here and to the questions in the following linked image (these are the types of questions the judges might ask of you):

https://drive.google.com/open?id=1P7UYxJhcpN7GBry3FglsMc0RLDvwoKRx

  

February 22nd, 2021

Deadline for Carver Fair participants to upload presentation materials.

 

February 24th, 2021

McCall Science Fair 

 

Week of March 1st, 2021

7-12 Carver Science Fair Judging of Uploaded Materials

Going to Carver Fair:

Here is a document with Practice questions to prepare for the Fair.

Tailor your project towards what the achievement the award recognizes to increase your chances of winning $$!

Read the Following Info "What To Do & Expect At The Carver Fair" and complete the Carver Fair Checklist.  In addition to your science fair logbook, you will also be required to have a binder with any forms, print outs of research sources, data that does not fit on your board, etc.

 

 

 

April (TBD), 2021

Going to the Delaware Valley Science Fair:

 

Here is a document with Practice questions to prepare for the Fair.

 

The following are tips from actual judges of the regional Delaware Valley Science Fair:

 

  • Make a copy of your logbook to leave with your board (sometimes students will sabotage other students' projects!)
  • Use a list to present your procedures or a visual flowchart is even better
  • Communicate effectively and clearly (you only have about 7 minutes with the judge and you want to make an impression)
  • Talk to the judges and look them in the eye - be personable and don't just be pointing to your board.
  • Make sure and discuss the social impact of why the science of your project will help humanity 
  • Having a lab book with a binder of all your research and notes is even better than a science fair log book
  • Make your graphs BIG!
  • When waiting for the judges at your board - don't move around, practice your presentations before you present, but then make sure you are seen doing academic type work or read a book (no cell phones out) after you present to the judges.
  • This year you will know approximately when you will present. 
  • Be confident!
  • Bring several clothing layers to the Expo Center - sometimes it is cold 
  • No free wifi ($20 to buy) at the expo center - download files to your hard drive if you need to work on them. 
  • Spell check everything - TWICE!
  • Make the font size on your board the largest as possible for everything.
  • Acknowledgements should not be on the board - take them off prior to going and reorganize your board
  • Everything should be in metric units
  • All pictures on your board should have a caption indicating who took the image or say "photo taken by student researcher" 
  • Your board should be neat and organized over fancy - letters should be straight and easy to read fonts.
  • No multi pages stapled so that the judges needs to turn them.  You may have a printed copy of your research paper with your lab book or science fair notebook. 

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